Magnesium Is Your Friend

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by fdecomite

Did you know that approximately 80% of Americans are magnesium deficient? Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol and experiencing high levels of emotional stress are two of the ways we lose it. If you are experiencing:

Increased perspiration and/or body odor,

Muscle cramps,

Arthritis, stones in the gallbladder or kidneys or bursitis,

Insomnia,

Anxiety

Urinary frequency or

Constipation

it may be a sign of a magnesium deficiency. Find out more with your family health care practitioner.

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Researching Myrrh

538513474_e818f2676eBilly Williams

Did you know that there are literally hundreds of herbs that make up the Chinese medicine materia medica? Myrrh is just one of our herbs.

Interested in learning more about the history of myrrh as medicine? Check out what someone from my alma mater is learning about myrrh here.

At The Cutting Edge Of The Future Of Healthcare

Have you ever considered how health care evolves over time? The health care practiced today is very different from health care of the past.  Asking what health care means brings many responses. Health care as a term encompasses many kinds of health “interventions”. Acupuncture, as part of traditional Chinese medicine, is certainly an important part of today’s health care. Check out the link below to see what’s happening on other fronts:

 

http://www.plminstitute.org/

What Kind Of Tree Are You?

Elm Tree by kevinkpc - (Catching Up)
Elm Tree, a photo by kevinkpc – (Catching Up) on Flickr.

When patients are trying to figure out traditional Chinese medicine’s angle on human health I often end up explaining by using an analogy of a person being a tree.

You can be whatever kind of tree you want to be. Your chief concern(s) are like a limb (or limbs if you have more than one issue). If we are considering only the limb in question, it looks like the limb is an independent thing. Likewise, multiple limbs look independent of each other. Everyone knows however, that the limb isn’t the whole tree. In fact, the limb doesn’t exist without the rest of the tree. All limbs originate from the same trunk and root system. An acupuncturist is always considering the limb(s) but also the entire tree. When we are formulating a treatment plan we can treat just the limb(s) in question, just the roots of the issue or a combination of both. When treating the “root’ causes of an issue, often not only does the limb of concern improve but the entire tree begins to thrive.

What kind of tree are you?

Step 1, Step 2, Step 3 Of Balanced Health, It’s As Easy As SRP

Primary by Cameron Booth
Primary, a photo by Cameron Booth on Flickr.

When you go to see your acupuncturist chances are you’re thinking: I just want my _____ to be better. The blank can be anything out of balance about your health. As an example, let’s use a very common chief concern: lower back pain.

While a patient is thinking of his or her pain, the acupuncturist is thinking: What’s behind this person’s pain? What led to this in the first place and how can we make sure that it doesn’t happen again or lead to worse things? No matter what your chief concern may be, the acupuncturist is thinking in terms of the three steps to balanced health.

The 3 steps are as follows:

Step 1
Symptom Alleviation
The first step is to get rid of the lower back pain.

Step 2
Restorative Care
Restorative care addresses the reason why lower back pain manifested in the first place. Not completing this step could mean the back pain returns.

Step 3
Protective Care
At this step the acupuncturist and patient are changing the focus of treatment away from being reactive to proactive. Instead of fixing ill health, treatment focus becomes supporting good health. At times this means maintenance office visits but for many it means implementing new habits of good health.

At every stage the acupuncturist’s tools are the same but hopefully the goal of treatment changes.

Simply alleviating pain is not the complete process to balanced health. The next time you visit your acupuncturist, ask them what the SRP is for you.

The East And West Of Things

Recently, I was reminiscing about my teacher Dr. Cao. There are many reasons to love and admire him but one day he said something that made me admire him just a smidge more. He told a group of us that America was perfectly situated halfway between the East and the West (Asia and Europe) and therefore received (and made use of) the ideas of both. I LOVED this observation for all sorts of reasons! One result of this phenomenon that most often sticks in my mind is how it positively impacts Americans and the variety of health care they can choose.

As acupuncturists we are selling a service: the traditional Asian medicine idea and way of health care/ good health maintenance. Where does this idea/way come from? And why does it often differ from what Western, allopathic medicine “sells”?

Both medicines are the on-going results of two very different “thinking systems”. It is often said that Western medicine’s thinking system is based upon the philosophy of Rene Descartes. In this system the body is viewed mechanically: a human is like a car. Just as there are different parts in a car, there are different parts to the human body therefore different kinds of doctors treat the different systems. For example, a psychologist addresses the mind part of a person, an oncologist is concerned if there is cancer in the body and so on. Divide, specify and specialize are the wonderful tools of Western medicine. In contrast, Eastern medicine, in this case traditional Asian medicine, takes on the endless fascinating puzzle of the human condition from the opposite direction: all things in the body are connected and so all are treated when one thing is treated. Traditional Asian medicine’s thinking system is based upon Taoism. Taoism sees the body more as a garden where each organism’s good health is dependent upon all the other garden dwellers’ good health. Confusing right? Well, a very practical way of explaining this often comes up in discussions with patients. When something happens to a patient (whatever their chief concern is: a car accident or depression or GI issues to name a few) it can happen to (start in) the physical body or it can be something emotional or both. Once something starts however, it often grows to include other areas.The thinking system of traditional Asian medicine organizes things in such a way that when acupuncturists treat, the treatment addresses both the physical and emotional aspects of a chief concern.

Ultimately, what does this mean for the person purchasing healthcare? Choice! And the best of both worlds! There are times when one or the other type of medicine is a no-brainer choice: if you have a big, bleeding wound don’t see your acupuncturist first. See them after you are stitched up and need help with healing. Conversely, if you have lower back pain consider acupuncture before surgery when appropriate.

Isn’t choice good?

What Does Acupuncture Treat?

Ginseng Oolong by chadao
Ginseng Oolong, a photo by chadao on Flickr.

Many patients are surprised by the answer to their question: What does acupuncture treat? You might be surprised too. Here’s just a short, incomplete list of things that herbal medicine and acupuncture address:

abdominal pain
acne
allergies
alopecia
Alzheimer’s
amenorrhea
angina
ankle pain
anxiety
arthritis
asthma

back pain
BPH
bronchitis
bursitis

cancer
candidiasis
canker sores
carpal tunnel syndrome
cataracts

cholesterol-high

chronic fatigue syndrome
common cold
conjunctivitis
constipation
cough
Crohn’s disease

depression
diabetes
diarrhea
dysmenorrhea

ear infection
early menstrual cycle
eczema
edema
endometriosis
eye pain

fever
fibroids
fibromyalgia
flu
focus
fungal infections

gastric pain
glaucoma
GERD
goiter
gout

hair loss
headache
hearing loss
heart disease
hemorrhoids
herpes
hiccup
hip pain
hypertension
hyper/hypothyroidism
hypochondriac pain
hypomenorrhea

immune deficiencies
impotence
incontinence
indigestion
infantile cough
infantile diarrhea
infertility
insomnia
irritability
IBS
itching
insufficient lactation
irregular/late/early/ lack of menstruation

jaundice

knee pain

leg pain
leukorrhea
low libido

mastitis
memory issues
menopausal imbalances
morning sickness
multiple sclerosis
muscle tension

neck pain (any musculoskeletal pain)
nosebleed

obesity

pain
palpitations
Parkinson’s disease
PCOS
PID
PMS

rhinitis/sinusitis

sciatica
shoulder pain
smoking addiction
sore throat
stress
stroke

tendonitis
tinnitus
TMJ
toothache

UC
upper respiratory tract infection
UTI
urticaria

varicose veins
vertigo

warts
women’s and men’s health issues

Have a question about a condition you don’t see listed? Call the office-